Posts Tagged ‘Occupational Safety and Health Administration’

Ala. Woodworker Hit With OSHA Safety Penalties

There was rot in this woodworker’s worker safety practices, according to federal regulators.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) on September 10 cited Harrison Industries LLC – operating as Structural Wood Systems Inc. – for exposing employees to multiple hazards at its Greenville, Alabama, worksite. The company faces $85,362 in proposed penalties.

OSHA cited the woodworking manufacturer for failing to ensure employees used protective eyewear and respirators, implement a respiratory protection and permit-required confined space program, and use guards on a motorized roller conveyer table; and for allowing combustible wood dust to accumulate, exposing employees to fire and explosion hazards. The inspection was conducted under OSHA’s National Emphasis Program on Combustible Dust and the National Emphasis Program on Amputations.

“This investigation is an example of why employers must implement effective safety and health programs to identify and address recognizable hazards that can cause serious injuries to employees,” said OSHA Mobile Area Office Director Joseph Roesler.

Structural Wood Systems has 15 business days from receipt of the citations and proposed penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education, and assistance. For more information, visit https://www.osha.gov.

OSHA Dings Roofing Contractor $105K for Noncompliance With Fall Protection Rules

[Note: This blog post was picked up by the Ohio Employer Law Blog  Sept. 14 weekly blog roundup]

This Florida roofing company literally fell down on the job when it came to protecting its workers from fall hazards.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Coastal Roofing Inc. for exposing employees to fall and other hazards at a St. Johns, Florida, worksite. The Jacksonville-based roofing company faces $105,283 in proposed penalties.

OSHA investigated the company as part of the Agency’s Regional Emphasis Program on Falls in Construction. Coastal Roofing was cited for failing to ensure employees utilized a fall protection system. OSHA also cited the contractor for failing to ensure employees utilized eye protection and not extending a portable ladder 3 feet above the roof landing. OSHA cited the company for similar safety violations in January 2018.

“The use of fall protection is not an option – it is a legal requirement that saves lives,” said OSHA Jacksonville Acting Area Office Director Michelle Gonzalez. “This company’s continued failure to comply with fall protection standards puts the lives of its employees at risk for serious or fatal injury.”

The company has 15 business days from receipt of the citations and proposed penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education, and assistance. For more information, visit https://www.osha.gov/.

OSHA Crackdown on Fall Hazards Continues; Levies $177K in Fines Against Two Companies

Two more companies have come up against federal workplace safety regulators’ campaign to eliminate fall hazards.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Hammers Construction Inc. and Montes Construction LLC after a fatal fall at a Greenwood Village, Colorado, worksite. The companies face proposed penalties of $177,893.

OSHA inspected the worksite in March 2018 after an employee fell while installing metal roofing panels on a storage unit building. OSHA cited the two construction companies for failing to use adequate fall protection and restrict employees from standing on the mid-rails of scissor lifts. OSHA also cited Montes Construction LLC in January 2018 for failing to provide fall protection, and now faces a willful citation.

“These employers failed to protect their employees from well-known and preventable fall hazards,” said OSHA Area Director David Nelson, in Englewood, Colorado. “This tragedy could have been prevented if they had met their obligations and provided the required fall protection.”

Hammers Construction Inc. and Montes Construction LLC have 15 business days from receipt of citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

OSHA Goes Viral With Silica Video

If you’re an employer or worker in the construction trade, the federal government’s safety watchdog has important information for you on its new silica dust exposure standard.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced yesterday that new frequently asked questions (FAQs) and training videos on the Agency’s standard for respirable crystalline silica in construction are now available online.

Developed by OSHA in cooperation with industry and labor organizations, the FAQs provide employers and workers with guidance on the standard’s requirements. In addition, a series of six new videos instruct users on methods for controlling exposure to silica dust when performing common construction tasks, or using construction equipment. The videos cover topics including handheld power saws, jackhammers, drills, and grinders.

Visit OSHA’s silica standard for construction page for more information and resources on complying with the standard.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

Manufacturer Fingered for Safety Violations

This Ohio manufacturer left safety violations fester and must now pay the piper, again.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited ArtiFlex Manufacturing for exposing workers at its Wooster location to amputation hazards after an employee suffered a partial finger amputation. The company faces $213,411 in proposed penalties.

OSHA investigators determined that the tool and manufacturing servicer failed to adequately guard pinch points on a conveyor belt. OSHA cited the company for similar violations at the same location in 2016, and has placed ArtiFlex Manufacturing in its Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

“This employer’s repeated failure to adequately guard machine operating parts put workers at risk for serious injuries,” said OSHA Area Office Director Howard Eberts, in Cleveland. “Employers are required to install and maintain machine guards to protect workers from amputation hazards.”

Artiflex Manufacturing has 15 business days from receipt of the citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit https://www.osha.gov.

OSHA Rips Tex. Contractor for Trench Collapses

This is a company people might want to avoid working for or patronizing until it can provides workers adequate safety protections.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited El Paso Underground Construction for failing to protect its employees from trench collapse hazards. The pipe-laying company faces proposed penalties of $190,642.

OSHA conducted an inspection after observing employees working in an unprotected trench. OSHA cited the company for failing to provide employees a safe means of entering and exiting a trench, not protecting employees against cave-ins, and for failing to train employees in safe work practices. OSHA cited the company four times in 2017 for failing to protect employees from trench collapse hazards. The Agency has placed El Paso Underground in OSHA’s Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

“This company has once again put their employees at serious risk by failing to provide training and implement required trenching protections,” said OSHA Area Office Director Diego Alvarado, in El Paso. “Unprotected trenches can be fatal and it is fortunate that no one was injured.”

El Paso Underground Construction has 15 business days from receipt of the citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.

OSHA Would Curtail “Personally Identifiable Information” in Workplace Injury Tracking Rule

Federal workplace safety officials are proposing to enhance privacy protections when it comes to reporting workplace injuries and illnesses.

The Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) to better protect personally identifiable information or data that could be re-identified with a particular individual by removing provisions of the “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses” rule. OSHA believes this proposal maintains safety and health protections for workers, protects privacy and reduces the burdens of complying with the current rule.

The proposed rule eliminates the requirement to electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300 (Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses), and OSHA Form 301 (Injury and Illness Incident Report) for establishments with 250 or more employees that are currently required to maintain injury and illness records. These establishments would be required to electronically submit information only from OSHA Form 300A (Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses).

Under the current recordkeeping rule, the deadline for electronic submission of Calendar Year (CY) 2017 information from OSHA Forms 300 and 301 was July 1, 2018. In subsequent years, the deadline is March 2. OSHA is not currently accepting the Form 300 or 301 data and will not enforce the deadlines for these two forms without further notice while this rulemaking is underway. The electronic portal collecting Form 300A data is accepting CY 2017 data, although submissions after July 1, 2018, will be marked late.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.