Posts Tagged ‘operation of construction cranes’

Crane Operation Safety Rule Proposed by OSHA

Improved safety conditions for crane operators at construction site is the goal of a new proposed rule from federal workplace safety regulators.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration on May 18 announced a proposed rule to increase the safety of America’s construction sites. In addition to providing long-term clarity regarding crane operator certification requirements, the proposal reinstates the employer duty to ensure that a crane operator is qualified to safely operate equipment.

Under the proposed rule, a change to the categories of certifications for crane operators would ensure more operators are able to meet the requirement. The proposal discontinues a 2010 requirement, which never went into effect, that crane operator certification must include the crane lifting capacity for which the operator is certified. The proposal would expand the type of certification programs for crane operators.

Comments on the proposed rule may be submitted electronically at http://www.regulations.gov, the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal, or by facsimile or mail. See the Federal Register noticefor submission details. Comments must be submitted by June 20, 2018.

OSHA recently published a final rule extending the operator certification compliance date until November 10, 2018, in order to provide the agency with additional time to complete this rulemaking to address stakeholder concerns related to the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

OSHA Seeks Delay to Nov. 2018 Certification Requirements for Construction Crane Operators

A certification process for crane operators in the construction industry would be pushed up another year under a proposed rule from the Occupational Safety and Health Adminstration.

OSHA on Wednesday issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to extend the employer’s responsibility to ensure crane operator competency and enforcement for crane operator certification to Nov. 10, 2018.

OSHA issued a final rule in September 2014, extending the deadline by three years for crane operator certification requirements in the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard. The final rule also extended by three years the employer’s responsibility to ensure that crane operators are competent to operate a crane safely.

(Read my prior post on the proposal to bump up the deadline by three years).

The agency is now proposing an extension of the enforcement date to address stakeholder concerns over the operator certification requirements in the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard.

Comments may submitted electronically at http://www.regulations.gov, the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal or by facsimile or mail. See the Federal Register notice for submission details and additional information about this proposed rule. Comments must be submitted by Sept. 29, 2017.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

OSHA Bumps Safety Certification Requirements for Crane Operators Until 2017

Crane operators would have an addition three years–until 2017–to meet certification requirements for safe operation of their equipment, under a proposal announced yesterday by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

In 2010, OSHA issued a final standard on requirements for cranes and derricks in construction work. Under the standard, crane operators on construction sites must meet one of four qualification/certification options by Nov. 10, 2014.

OSHA decided to postpone the date, however, after a number of parties raised concerns about the qualification/certification requirements. OSHA said it is considering addressing these concerns through a later separate rulemaking.

In addition, the agency said it will propose to extend the compliance date so that the qualification/certification requirements do not take effect during potential rulemaking or cause disruption to the construction industry.

For your Memorial Day pleasure reading, OSHA has posted the minutes of stakeholders meetings it held on the certification/operation issues in April 2013.