Posts Tagged ‘workplace safety’

OSHA Dings Roofing Contractor $105K for Noncompliance With Fall Protection Rules

[Note: This blog post was picked up by the Ohio Employer Law Blog  Sept. 14 weekly blog roundup]

This Florida roofing company literally fell down on the job when it came to protecting its workers from fall hazards.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Coastal Roofing Inc. for exposing employees to fall and other hazards at a St. Johns, Florida, worksite. The Jacksonville-based roofing company faces $105,283 in proposed penalties.

OSHA investigated the company as part of the Agency’s Regional Emphasis Program on Falls in Construction. Coastal Roofing was cited for failing to ensure employees utilized a fall protection system. OSHA also cited the contractor for failing to ensure employees utilized eye protection and not extending a portable ladder 3 feet above the roof landing. OSHA cited the company for similar safety violations in January 2018.

“The use of fall protection is not an option – it is a legal requirement that saves lives,” said OSHA Jacksonville Acting Area Office Director Michelle Gonzalez. “This company’s continued failure to comply with fall protection standards puts the lives of its employees at risk for serious or fatal injury.”

The company has 15 business days from receipt of the citations and proposed penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education, and assistance. For more information, visit https://www.osha.gov/.

OSHA Crackdown on Fall Hazards Continues; Levies $177K in Fines Against Two Companies

Two more companies have come up against federal workplace safety regulators’ campaign to eliminate fall hazards.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Hammers Construction Inc. and Montes Construction LLC after a fatal fall at a Greenwood Village, Colorado, worksite. The companies face proposed penalties of $177,893.

OSHA inspected the worksite in March 2018 after an employee fell while installing metal roofing panels on a storage unit building. OSHA cited the two construction companies for failing to use adequate fall protection and restrict employees from standing on the mid-rails of scissor lifts. OSHA also cited Montes Construction LLC in January 2018 for failing to provide fall protection, and now faces a willful citation.

“These employers failed to protect their employees from well-known and preventable fall hazards,” said OSHA Area Director David Nelson, in Englewood, Colorado. “This tragedy could have been prevented if they had met their obligations and provided the required fall protection.”

Hammers Construction Inc. and Montes Construction LLC have 15 business days from receipt of citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

OSHA Rips Tex. Contractor for Trench Collapses

This is a company people might want to avoid working for or patronizing until it can provides workers adequate safety protections.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited El Paso Underground Construction for failing to protect its employees from trench collapse hazards. The pipe-laying company faces proposed penalties of $190,642.

OSHA conducted an inspection after observing employees working in an unprotected trench. OSHA cited the company for failing to provide employees a safe means of entering and exiting a trench, not protecting employees against cave-ins, and for failing to train employees in safe work practices. OSHA cited the company four times in 2017 for failing to protect employees from trench collapse hazards. The Agency has placed El Paso Underground in OSHA’s Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

“This company has once again put their employees at serious risk by failing to provide training and implement required trenching protections,” said OSHA Area Office Director Diego Alvarado, in El Paso. “Unprotected trenches can be fatal and it is fortunate that no one was injured.”

El Paso Underground Construction has 15 business days from receipt of the citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.

Fatal Fall Costs Company $250K in Fines

Some workplace safety violations are egregious enough to trigger criminal and not just civil liability.

U.S. District Court Judge Ed Kinkeade has ordered Design Plastering West LLC to pay criminal and civil penalties for criminal violations of occupational safety and health standards after an employee suffered a fatal fall at an apartment complex in Dallas. The court ordered the company to pay a $150,000 criminal fine, $100,000 civil penalty, admit to eight willful violations, and to undergo monitoring by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for four years.

On May 14, 2015, a worker fell from a third floor balcony while applying stucco without fall protection. OSHA cited the company for willfully failing to install scaffolding and provide workers with personal fall protection. In May 2018, Design Plastering West LLC pleaded guilty to the willful citation on fall protection.

“This company failed to comply with well-known safety requirements,” said OSHA’s Dallas Region Acting Regional Administrator Eric Harbin. “This sentence should serve as a reminder that employers can be held criminally responsible for failing to protect their workers’ safety.”

The criminal prosecution and sentencing in this case was the result of a collaboration between OSHA, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of the Solicitor, and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Texas.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.

Fatality at Fla. Shipyard Draws Six-Figure OSHA Fine; Latest in a Series of Safety Violations at Site

This shipyard in Florida is a nightmare worksite, the way federal safety regulators paint what’s going on there.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited North Florida Shipyards Inc., a shipbuilding and repair company, after an employee suffered fatal injuries at its Commodores Point facility in Jacksonville, Florida. The shipyard faces $271,061 in proposed penalties.

The worker drowned after a pressured air manifold struck him and knocked him into the St. Johns River. OSHA has cited the employer for safety violations, including exposing employees to being struck-by, drowningamputation, caught-in, and electrical hazards; allowing scuba divers to be unaccompanied by another diver; and failing to ensure machine guarding.

“As this case demonstrates, it is important for employers to identify existing hazards, and follow required safety procedures to protect workers from serious injuries,” said OSHA Jacksonville Acting Area Office Director Buddy Underwood.

North Florida Shipyards has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and proposed penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education, and assistance. For more information, visit https://www.osha.gov.

OSHA: Roofing Company Exposed Employees to Fall, Other Safety Hazards at Home Building Sites

This West Virginia roofing company will have to take the fall for not adequately protecting its workers from falling, according to federal safety officials.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Design Roofing LLC for exposing employees to fall and other safety hazards at residential construction sites in Scott Depot and Culloden, West Virginia. The company faces proposed penalties of $101,988.

OSHA inspected the two work sites after receiving complaints of employees working without proper fall protection. The Agency issued willful violations for the fall hazards, and serious violations for allowing employees to work within close proximity of an energized electrical conductor, and improper use of an extension ladder.

Falls are the leading cause of fatalities in construction, but they can be prevented if employers comply with fall protection requirements,”said OSHA Charleston Area Office Director Prentice Cline. “This employer’s disregard of required safety procedures leave employees vulnerable to hazards that can cause serious or fatal injuries.”

The company has 15 business days from receipt of the citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.

OSHA: Injury Data Due From Employers July 1

Just 48 hours to go before an important deadline for certain industries to report their safety data to federal regulators.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is reminding employers that the deadline for electronically submitting their 2017 Form 300A data to OSHA is July 1, 2018.

Electronic submissions are required of establishments with 250 or more employees that are currently required to keep OSHA injury and illness records, and establishments with 20-249 employees that are classified in specific industries with historically high rates of occupational injuries and illnesses.

For more information, and a link to the Injury Tracking Application, visit the Injury Tracking Application Electronic Submission of Injury and Illness Records to OSHA.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.